These are my seashells.

August 11, 2012 at 9:53am
0 notes

User Manual: It's OK to Be a Hater Because Everything Is Bad(via @Gizmodo) →

[Editor’s Note: I am not editing this. Because I do not know what it is. But you should read it. —Joe] Almost everything is bad. Usually, really bad, and not even bad in an interesting way.

9:43am
3,499 notes
Reblogged from theamericanprospect
captainrobocop:

washingtonpoststyle:

theamericanprospect:

Is this the best GIF of the millennium? We think, YES.
If this is a big part of the job description, I have renewed faith in my ability to be Secretary of State someday. 

How does this not have 75,000 reblogs yet? P.S. Our Anne Gearan is in Africa with the semi-booty-dropping secretary.

My new life goal is to figure out the right words to say about this gif.

captainrobocop:

washingtonpoststyle:

theamericanprospect:

Is this the best GIF of the millennium? We think, YES.

If this is a big part of the job description, I have renewed faith in my ability to be Secretary of State someday. 

How does this not have 75,000 reblogs yet? P.S. Our Anne Gearan is in Africa with the semi-booty-dropping secretary.

My new life goal is to figure out the right words to say about this gif.

9:36am
4 notes
Reblogged from vidacommunity

Study tracks rise of feminine pronouns | AP | Hillel Italie →

But as VIDA has demonstrated, more books by women does not mean more books are getting reviewed or more women getting to write for literary publications. For the past two years, VIDA has released studies showing that such magazines as The New Yorker and The Atlantic devoted far more space to male writers than to women, a ratio that led New Yorker editor David Remnick to acknowledge “We’ve got to do better.”

9:35am
2,485 notes
Reblogged from ferris-wheels

“In an entertainment world where women are disappearing... →

bbook:

in an entertainment world where women are disappearing from multiplexes, where men bulk up as superheroes while women don’t eat but sip pink drinks, we need to remember that there was once a very short heroine who hunted monsters and talked about einstein, who kicked ass and questioned her faith, who went to work with a man she loved but didn’t rip his shirt off over lunch, who didn’t want to believe, but opened herself nonetheless to possibility. we need scully back, even for a moment.

This makes me almost want to start watching the X-Files.

Almost.

(Source: ferris-wheels)

9:25am
0 notes

I of The Tiger: You Don’t Need That Fancy Shit

In order to “work out” to a hardcore degree you will need the following things: some old shorts, old shoes (optional), old t-shirt (optional), caffeine, and a will to achieve that burns like a fire unto your very soul. The total cost of these items is about five bucks, give or take. It’s nice to join a gym, if you can afford it, because they have barbells and cages and hundreds of pounds of iron plates, which you probably do not have in your apartment. But if you can’t afford it, you can carry some god damn rocks and sandbags and gallon jugs of water. You say that I need to pay a hefty fee in order to come into your “fancy” gym? I say that I’m right on the public sidewalk outside, doing pushups until I develop tetanus in my palms, absolutely free, until the police are called. Now who’s fancy? You are. But I have fewer expenses.

This is just an excerpt. The whole article is worth reading. 

August 5, 2012 at 10:26pm
76 notes
Reblogged from whatshouldwecallpoets

When white male writers complain that publications devoted to promoting the work of women and people of color are “unfair”

whatshouldwecallpoets:

(via vidacommunity)

July 30, 2012 at 9:59am
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Love is an interrogation.

— Milan Kundera, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting

July 18, 2012 at 4:07pm
2,359 notes
Reblogged from tballardbrown

Recently discovered images from the great Gordon Parks show rarely seen color images from our civil rights history.
via Gordon Parks’s Alternative Civil Rights Photographs - NYTimes.com

Recently discovered images from the great Gordon Parks show rarely seen color images from our civil rights history.

via Gordon Parks’s Alternative Civil Rights Photographs - NYTimes.com

(via bbook)

July 17, 2012 at 1:55pm
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Do Business Schools Incubate Criminals?

NB: This is an excerpt, emphasis in bold is mine.

Most business schools do offer ethics classes. Yet these classes are generally divided into two categories. Some simply illustrate ethical dilemmas without taking a position on how people are expected to act. It is as if students were presented with the pros and cons of racial segregation, leaving them to decide which side they wanted to take.

Others hide behind the concept of corporate social responsibility, suggesting that social obligations rest on firms, not on individuals. I say “hide” because a firm is nothing but an organized group of individuals. So before we talk about corporate social responsibility, we need to talk about individual social responsibility. If we do not recognize the latter, we cannot talk about the former.

Oddly, most economists see their subject as divorced from morality. They liken themselves to physicists, who teach how atoms do behave, not how they should behave. But physicists do not teach to atoms, and atoms do not have free will. If they did, physicists would and should be concerned about how the atoms being instructed could change their behavior and affect the universe. Experimental evidence suggests that the teaching of economics does have an effect on students’ behavior: It makes them more selfish and less concerned about the common good. This is not intentional. Most teachers are not aware of what they are doing.

My colleague Gary Becker pioneered the economic study of crime. Employing a basic utilitarian approach, he compared the benefits of a crime with the expected cost of punishment (that is, the cost of punishment times the probability of receiving that punishment). While very insightful, Becker’s model, which had no intention of telling people how they should behave, had some unintended consequences. A former student of Becker’s told me that he found many of his classmates to be remarkably amoral, a fact he took as a sign that they interpreted Becker’s descriptive model of crime as prescriptive. They perceived any failure to commit a high-benefit crime with a low expected cost as a failure to act rationally, almost a proof of stupidity.

- Luigi Zingales, professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business

July 10, 2012 at 1:27pm
0 notes

Jesus Ain't Your Boyfriend →